The figure of 12% is to be found in Dr. Jawanza Kunjufu’s recently released book – ‘Understanding Black Male Learning Styles’ – in which he says, “Understanding black male learning styles is critical to academic success.”

Which takes us to today Thursday 11th April, Dr. Yvette Jackson will be the keynote speaker at the NYC DOE EMPOWERING BOYS INITIATIVE (Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture).

Here Dr. Jackson will present research supporting her ‘Pedagogy of Confidence: Inspiring High Intellectual Performance in Urban Schools‘.

The essence is that high intellectual performance can be achieved when instruction and classroom environment are modified to include culturally relevant strategies through High Operational Practices that fortify the cognitive skills necessary for all students to meet the demands of the Common Core State Standards.

I Blend Research and Classroom Practice!
My Jazzles ELA program is built on research, focusing particularly on VAK-T learning styles and mnemonics. But some times I think research gets more attention than solutions.

So here’s this blog’s takeout!
There is a solution for Black American boys in PreK-G2. It’s called Jazzles ELA.
It is based on decades of practical classroom experiences and the oft forgotten, old time teacher skills, of ingenuity and creativity!
(Sadly replaced these days by committee-based prescriptive pedagogies.)

Using Jazzles ELA, schools will significantly reverse 50 years of failed resources and pedagogies to achieve consistently high levels of reading proficiency among our most disadvantaged.

As Eli Broad (@UnreasonableEli), says in a current tweet ‘Anyone in any line of work can use “Why Not?” to make small but significant changes in day-today operations’.

So my little request to Dr Jackson, Dr. Kunjufu, and all schools experiencing this issue, is:
Why not review Jazzles ELA in the toughest school you can ‘throw’ at me?
All I need is 1-2 weeks, an Interactive Whiteboard, some photocopy paper and art materials.
(Notes: You’ll see an impact on day 1. Doesn’t need much teacher training, because Jazzles is essentially ‘intuitive’.)

Summary
Dr. Yvette Jackson’s is the ‘Pedagogy of Confidence’.
Mine is the ‘Pedagogy of Engagement‘.
Through it’s pedagogy, particularly teaching from what is known, children acquire confidence because risks of failure are effectively removed. (See my very next blog!!)

How Jazzles caters for Black American boys – without losing the girls (or anyone else!).

BLACK AMERICAN Students
Movement and rhythm components are vital – along with the full battery of Jazzles resources and strategies. This includes:
• Kinesthetic/tactile experiences.
• Processing visual information.
• Opportunities for expressive creativity (e.g. oral expression).
• Nonverbal communication (including intonation, body language, dance and drama, etc.).

Important strategies include working with background music playing (a key Jazzles language practice strategy) and creating an environment that encourages harmony, cooperation, and socialization.

Jazzles embeds all these strategies in its resources and pedagog

BOYS

Stunning!
Says New York Times Best Selling author Michael Gurian ( ‘The Minds of Boys’).

Jazzles resources and pedagogy is embedded with differentiated instruction strategies that create boy friendly classrooms – while still engaging the girls, both sexes at extraordinary levels.
For boys,Jazzles is full of experiential single-task focus projects and visual-spatial/body-kinesthetic learning, the latter catering for boys’ natural desire to move.

LOW SES
The Jazzles pedagogy tackles all the core challenges these students face including lack of vocabulary, general knowledge, self-confidence as well as behavioral and emotional problems. Features include:
• Jazzles ELA is a multifaceted program that enables children to experience and practice learning in a multitude of different ways. For example, a key vocabulary strategy is to use the JazzleOke cartoons to power language rich conversations, drama and topic exploration.
• By focusing on one JazzleOke theme a week, children rapidly develop a common class-wide language base familiar to every child. This enables every child, advantaged and disadvantaged, to join-in happily.
• Week by week, low SES students incrementally develop their language base, general knowledge, their confidence and the joy of learning cooperatively.
• With Jazzles, there are frequent, varied, and extensive language experiences through its directed listening and discussion strategies.
• This includes the role of rich language. Around 5% of Jazzles lyrics are composed of ‘big/unfamiliar’ words – like ‘astronaut’, ‘astonished’ and ‘outstretched’. These big words are the ones children find easiest to remember while also fostering word consciousness.
• For low SES students, song-powered Jazzles brightens their day with happiness and joy. It also provides unique opportunities to engage families in their children’s education, and in the process improve literacy standards in the home.

Re Other Groups
For Hispanic, REGED, SPED, ESL/EFL refer to Equity for All on my website.

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