Number 10 in My Series – Strategies Making the Jazzles Difference

Here’s why the Jazzles ELA methodology is so different to any other early reading/ ELA program you have experienced.
“…a committee of nationally recognized professors and educators, seeking to bring some sense to the arguments over the best way of teaching reading, produced a report that said no single reading instruction method, used in isolation, works best for all children. The report by the National Research Council recommended that teachers use a mix of phonics and creative exercises.” — The Washington Post 1998 (Book Review of ‘Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children’ by Catherine E. Snow, M. Susan Burns, and Peg Griffin) June 2010

Jazzles ELA absolutely follows that recommendation.

I’ve designed the program to include over 50 substantive instructional strategies to help children learn skills they need to defy the challenges of word deficits, word knowledge and even, as in New Canton, Virginia, children too poor to experience even books and pencils.

The more Reading Strategies children are able to use, the easier it will be for them to read new text successfully.

These strategies include applying meaning, internalized language knowledge (vocabulary) and phonemic awareness skills.

With Jazzles ELA, children are taught never to rely on only one of these skills but how to use two or even three strategies to successfully decode and correct mistakes.

Once learned, these strategies will become tools that are eventually applied automatically – as when they graduate to independent readers.

For example, the following strategies used simultaneously help children decode an unknown word in an illustrated book. Children can:
• Use the initial sound/letter of the word (phonemic awareness).
• Use the illustration (for meaning).
• Consider what word would fit naturally into the sentence ( internalized knowledge of the structure of English sentences).

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