This is possibly the most important blog about Jazzles ELA. If you understand this, you ‘get’ Jazzles ELA!

The Jazzles learning system uses a ‘whole-part-whole’ learning approach.
We know from experience that if we first see the complete image for a jigsaw, we have a framework and valuable information upon which we can fit the pieces together.

Mixed Ability Classes and the Applicability of Whole-Part-Whole/Global Processing
This is all about embedding learning styles within a pedagogy fully integrated with resource to meet the needs of today’s diverse student intake.

The Jazzles ELA program is rich in kinesthetic and tactual-kinesthetic experiences appropriate for ‘global thinkers’ preferring ‘whole-part-whole’ processing.
This benefits three core student groups in mixed ability classes:
1. Research substantiates that most Special Education children are global processors, with tactual and kinesthetic-perceptual strengths (Kyriacou & Dunn, 1994).
2. This is also true for Hispanic Americans/Asian Americans/ and EFL/ESL including most Asian students (Dunn & Griggs, 1995). Also the majority of children today are visual/kinesthetic learners. (See also #3)
3. Critically importantly for African-Americans, particularly boys. Acknowledged African-American Educational expert, Dr. Jawanza Kunjufu estimates that as many as two-thirds of students and an even larger percentage of African American males are visual-picture, oral/auditory, and tactile/kinesthetic learners (right-brain). However, most of the learning activities are oriented toward visual-print learners (left-brain). According to Dr. Kunjufu, this conflict between pedagogy and Black male learning styles has created a disastrous learning environment for right-brain students, and it must be resolved if Black boys are to improve their classroom performance. (Source: www.africanamericanimages.com)

Meeting the engagement demands of this diversity of children to activate learning is what is so spectacular about Jazzles ELA. No other program does it.

It is true that the process of reading involves the application of more than 1 skill simultaneously. In the past, learning to read involved teaching beginning reading skills often in isolation, and then incorporating them.

Jazzles’ new, song-powered approach is to first emotionally engage children with ‘whole’ text in the engaging form of JazzleOke 1. From then on, every fun, visual, kinaesthetic and aural interaction with this unique resource is the framework for an intuitive, ‘learn to read’ tutorial’!

This is why I encourage everyone to download Jazzles ‘Blue Bus Blues’ Unit to test and explore the themed lesson plans, ‘arts’ activities and interactive experiences. This way you can fully appreciate why both students and teachers love this ‘whole-part-whole’ processing program.

Here’s how!
With every JazzleOke 1 experience, children are simultaneously learning the 6 beginning reading skills while practicing oral vocabulary.

Check how children will process these 6 beginning reading skills as they watch JazzleOke1 ‘Blue Bus Blues’.
• Letter/sound and upper/lowercase correspondence, (Alphabetic Principle)
• Initial sound fluency (Phonemic Awareness)
• Understanding words in context/ visual literacy (Comprehension)
• Internalized English language knowledge (Vocabulary)
• Pronunciation, intonation and phrasing(Fluency)
• L-R tracking , one to one correspondence, use of punctuation (Concepts about Print)

From the mental scaffolding of an internalized language (lyric) framework, students have learning purpose to ‘take out’ sight and spelling words, unusual phonemes, grammatical information and punctuation. Etc. Learned words and language information can then be applied purposefully in communication, reading, and writing.

When JazzleOke I is transformed into the ‘whole’ text as in JazzleBook 2 or in JazzleOke 3, it’s a simple step to experience initial reading success!

This is why I am excited – especially when receive feedback about children effortlessly developing vocabulary and beginning reading confidence that can mean the crucial difference between future failure or success.

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