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A fun, new, ‘learn to read’ methodology for disadvantaged children?

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Can every child (including ESL, SPED and socio-economic disadvantaged children) experience beginning reading success?

Is there a new ‘learn to read’, multimedia approach that engages the spectrum of learning needs in every mixed ability class?

Interested? Test it out!
Digital/visual media, music, singing and movement engage today’s children.

The Jazzles ELA’s unique ‘learn to read’ methodology uses all these features to emotionally and intellectually engage beginning readers.

Together, they create optimal, simultaneous visual, aural and kinetic engagement by catering for every child’s preferred learning style profile.

Using supporting themed resources and visual and performing arts, Jazzles creates fun, interactive social and digital experiences that provides multiple forms of practice to consolidate skills without the dreaded ‘drill and kill’ that annihilates any learning/ teaching joy!

Try It! Why Not?
Your free, Jazzles ‘Blue Bus Blues’ Unit download allows you test levels of joy and engagement with your students, and explore how the Jazzles song-powered ELA program works.

Its key resource – JazzleOke 1 - shows how the 6 beginning ‘learn to read’ skills (Letter-Sound Correspondence, Phonemic Awareness, Vocabulary, Comprehension, Fluency and Concepts about Print) are acquired intuitively through fun visual, aural and kinesthetic interaction.

Can Jazzles unique ‘learn to read’ methodology be a life-changing, ‘beginning reading success’ solution for teachers with disadvantaged children in mixed ability classes ?
Let me know what you think.

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Teachers: Will We Ever Learn? And What I’m Doing About It!

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‘Teachers: Will We Ever Learn?’ is a headline in yesterday’s New York Times. Click here to open.

It’s a great article by Jal Mehta, an assistant professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and the author of the forthcoming book “The Allure of Order: High Hopes, Dashed Expectations, and the Troubled Quest to Remake American Schooling.”

He says in one paragraph: “… what happens in classrooms, hasn’t changed much in the century since the Progressive Era. On the whole, we still have the same teachers, in the same roles, with the same level of knowledge, in the same schools, with the same materials, and much the same level of parental support.”

Professor Mehta, not for the want of trying!
Unlike Sir Ken Robinson et al, there’s little point in complaining about lack of creativity in schools. I’ve sold my house to create and fund a totally new 21st Century Engagement Pedagogy designed to cater for VAK-T learning styles – using new ground breaking pedagogical resources.

Dianne Ravitch may not support the Common Core Standards. I do, because it provides a benchmark upon which DoE’s and ISDs can judge materials – mine included. And guess what, Jazzles ELA will beat any other PreK to K program hands down and meet/exceed CCSS ELA for Kindergarten!

So what am going to do about it today??
I’m taking time off to work out a new strategy as to how I can get DoEs, ISDs and Principals to say, in the words of Eli Broad, “Why not?” as in “Lesley Beth is claiming all these things about how her program is solving issues of engaging mixed ability PreK-G1 classes. Is it fact or garbage?”

Well just two weeks trying out Jazzles in a class would tell you. So why not try it??
As I said in previous blog, give me your toughest PreK-G1, and I’ll show you how I can engage, manage and motivate them! What’s the risk? NOTHING!
Except you might turn upside down the theories and resources of yesterday.

I’m Going Bush!
So for the next 10 days, I’m going bush – no phones, no electricity, so many stars, you’re dazzled!

And here’s a good summary of where my husband and I are going – courtesy of Australia’s greatest poet, Banjo Patterson

“And down by Kosciusko, where the pine-clad ridges raise
Their torn and rugged battlements on high,
Where the air is clear as crystal, and the white stars fairly blaze
At midnight in the cold and frosty sky,
And where around The Overflow the reed beds sweep and sway
To the breezes, and the rolling plains are wide,
The man from Snowy River is a household word today,
And the stockmen tell the story of his ride.”

My husband, who’s British, insists on swimming. It’s cold but crystal clear – we drink it without boiling!
Back on the 22nd April – and thanks for all the hundreds of messages of support.
Tweet@lesleyBeth

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9: Phonemic Awareness Skills – What Education Schools Aren’t Teaching!

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Number 9 in My Series – Strategies Making the Jazzles Difference
In May 2006, the National Council on Teacher Quality published an extensive report on ‘What Education Schools Aren’t Teaching About Reading’.

It found that “the two ‘newest’ components of good reading instruction — phonemic awareness and fluency— were broached in the fewest classes, just one in 20 education schools. In contrast, phonics, long the linchpin of reading, was taught in one out of seven classes, with slightly more frequency than comprehension, arguably the hallmark component for the whole language approach.”

Providing Support for Elementary Teachers
Unlike nearly every other PreK-G1 resource, Jazzles focuses on developing phonemic awareness skills via songs that are prolifically alliterative (the repetition of the same initial sound in several words in connected text). Children love alliteration because it is ‘tongue-twisting’ and memorable.

Over 40,000 YouTube Plays

Over 40,000 YouTube Plays

Click to Play and see alliteration in action!

Strong Mnemonic Aid
Alliteration is also a key component of the Jazzles multiple memory strategies.
Research shows that it is more probable that children will consistently remember expressions that alliterate than those that don’t.  This appears to be almost intuitive.

Phonemic awareness is the strongest predictor of reading success – more highly related to reading development than intelligence, reading readiness, and listening comprehension (Stanovich, 1986,1994). Jazzles lyrics excel at developing the phonemic awareness skill of initial sound fluency.

Two independent theses (2008) using Jazzles Songs support its effectiveness. See Previous Post

What’s the Take-Out?
Jazzles ELA not only provides the resources that engage children to intuitively develop their phonemic awareness skills, it also provides the teachers with how to teach it using the Jazzles ELA Advanced Lesson Plans!

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8: How to Easily Catch Up to Reading Levels of Shanghai, HK, Finland, Sweden, S. Korea and Singapore!

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No 8 in 30 Pedagogical Strategies Making the Jazzles Difference

The deliberate integration of the arts into my Jazzles English Arts program creates positive group culture and accelerates literacy skill acquisition. 

Benefits also extend into math (patterns) and non-cognitive skills, including student focus and behavoir.

 Two independent 2008 university supervised studies prove that’s what Jazzles does!

Whether you are a regular or specialist teacher, just by using Jazzles multimedia resources and song-themed lesson plans (especially created for mixed abilities), you can achieve extremely high levels of engagement and ELA learning resulting in superior outcomes.

In 2008, as part of her Masters of Arts Degree, a Missouri kindergarten teacher wrote a thesis focusing on the impact of using music (in effect, Jazzles songs) to improve kindergarten reading levels.  Using tests such as DIBELS, Scott Foresman, Reading Street, Reading A-Z, just under  40% of her class achieved end of year kindergarten literacy levels in the first semester. (Half were entitled to free meals) 

 

Change over 12 weeks in the first semester using Jazzles

Kindergarten student scores achieved over 12 weeks in the first semester using Jazzles

Achieved in 12 weeks of first semester.

Kindergarten student scores achieved over 12 weeks in the  first semester using Jazzles.

“I was astonished,” said the teacher, “to see how much their DIBELS scores improved after incorporating Jazzles!”

Places like Shanghai, Hong Kong, Finland, Sweden, South Korea and Singapore are at the top level of academic achievement for reading, math and science.

What these top achievers have in common, is providing real time for music in the classroom.  Compare this to the tokenism, if any, found in lower performing USA, UK and Australia.

While Jazzles is not a music instruction program, it is the first complete curriculum program to  intelligently uses the attributes of song (automatic, practice, elevated happy emotion, and language memory) and performance, to develop cognitive (especially literacy) and non cognitive skills, including social skills, confidence and focus.

Music/songs engage intellectually and emotionally.  Drama linked to familiar songs provides ‘virtual experiences’ – bringing language to life and opportunity for inferential and creative thinking. Think how powerful a package of skills that is!  Jazzles has it and more!

In the process, Jazzles is helping prepare children for the Conceptual/‘Right Brain’ Age – where it is expected that futures will be determined more by peoples’ abilities to apply creative, holistic and innovative thinking, than logical and linear thinking.

Every Jazzles Unit of song-themed, Lesson Plans with activity pages, interactive games and Visual and Performing Arts activities continue to extend the ‘whole-part-whole’ ELA learning, motivate self initiated learning in other areas!

Click here and download a free Jazzles Advanced ELA Lesson Plan and see how Creative Arts can easily be integrated to power literacy and vital non-cognitive skills.

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What Type of Tears Do You Shed for Your Curriculum Materials?

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“More tears have been shed over wishes granted than wishes denied,”  said the iconic Burmese opposition politician Aung San Suu Kyi
Here are a few instances experienced with Jazzles!
Teacher 1 PreK Headstart Texas

“The kids are loving Jazzles and one of my students cried today because we didn’t have time for Jazzles, I mean real tears. We were getting gifts ready for parents and no time for Jazzles today.  I thought I will make sure that never happens again.

They love all the songs and we are working with letter Nn (No! No!) currently.

Again, Jazzles has made a difference in my program, and the kids request it, sometimes even with tears.  To say they love Jazzles is an understatement”

Teacher 2 Western Australia
“My assessments were done last month. Letter/sound recognition has increased, along with interest in reading. But what I notice most is the unity that Jazzles bring to the group. They will just be sitting there ready for snack, and they will start singing. That brings tears to my eyes, because they will have fond memories of singing those songs together. They are excited about Jazzles, and ask for it daily. They just love it!”

Teacher 3 Illinois

Working with Jazzles Lyrics Pages, these 2nd and 3rd Grade Bilingual Students in an Illinois school brought tears to their teacher’s eyes

Working with Jazzles Lyrics Pages, these 2nd and 3rd Grade Bilingual Students in an Illinois school brought tears to their teacher’s eyes

“Last week, we had student-led conferences with parents and after two of the boys above had finished, the one on the right, Christopher who had arrived in the USA just 8 weeks ago, asked if he could show his mom“the computer”.

I asked him what he wanted to show and said “the songs”. I asked which one and he said (Jazzles) ‘Lots of Love’.

We put it on the screen and the two boys grabbed their song books and proceeded to sing to their moms!

My eyes welled up with tears and I could hardly tell who was smiling more – the boys or their moms.

It was cool!  (It was the two boys on the right above – seen reading their printed Jazzles lyrics.).

When I look over at my students singing along, you can see the level of concentration on their faces. We found out the girls sang ‘Orange Octopus’ better than the boys and ‘No! No! No!’ is definitely a Halloween favorite.

I thought of you often while singing the songs and just wanted you to know you have given our year a significant jump start. Thanks for developing such a unique approach to early literacy.
They think I’m a cool, fun teacher, but you laid the groundwork for all of us!”

 

 

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