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What Type of Tears Do You Shed for Your Curriculum Materials?

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“More tears have been shed over wishes granted than wishes denied,”  said the iconic Burmese opposition politician Aung San Suu Kyi
Here are a few instances experienced with Jazzles!
Teacher 1 PreK Headstart Texas

“The kids are loving Jazzles and one of my students cried today because we didn’t have time for Jazzles, I mean real tears. We were getting gifts ready for parents and no time for Jazzles today.  I thought I will make sure that never happens again.

They love all the songs and we are working with letter Nn (No! No!) currently.

Again, Jazzles has made a difference in my program, and the kids request it, sometimes even with tears.  To say they love Jazzles is an understatement”

Teacher 2 Western Australia
“My assessments were done last month. Letter/sound recognition has increased, along with interest in reading. But what I notice most is the unity that Jazzles bring to the group. They will just be sitting there ready for snack, and they will start singing. That brings tears to my eyes, because they will have fond memories of singing those songs together. They are excited about Jazzles, and ask for it daily. They just love it!”

Teacher 3 Illinois

Working with Jazzles Lyrics Pages, these 2nd and 3rd Grade Bilingual Students in an Illinois school brought tears to their teacher’s eyes

Working with Jazzles Lyrics Pages, these 2nd and 3rd Grade Bilingual Students in an Illinois school brought tears to their teacher’s eyes

“Last week, we had student-led conferences with parents and after two of the boys above had finished, the one on the right, Christopher who had arrived in the USA just 8 weeks ago, asked if he could show his mom“the computer”.

I asked him what he wanted to show and said “the songs”. I asked which one and he said (Jazzles) ‘Lots of Love’.

We put it on the screen and the two boys grabbed their song books and proceeded to sing to their moms!

My eyes welled up with tears and I could hardly tell who was smiling more – the boys or their moms.

It was cool!  (It was the two boys on the right above – seen reading their printed Jazzles lyrics.).

When I look over at my students singing along, you can see the level of concentration on their faces. We found out the girls sang ‘Orange Octopus’ better than the boys and ‘No! No! No!’ is definitely a Halloween favorite.

I thought of you often while singing the songs and just wanted you to know you have given our year a significant jump start. Thanks for developing such a unique approach to early literacy.
They think I’m a cool, fun teacher, but you laid the groundwork for all of us!”

 

 

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Neuroeducation specialist wanted to test Jazzles ELA Conceptual Model.

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We are trying to find a neuroscientist / neuroeducation specialist to research why the Jazzles ELA program  and conceptual model achieves boosts in learning and reading skills.  
Educational equity would be the major beneficiary as well as facilitating quality teaching.
If you know of any institute or PHD who would be interested, please let me know.
Sincerely
Lesley Beth 
lesleybeth@jazzles.com
The Brief
Does the conceptual framework and the pedagogical methodology approach typified by Jazzles ELA boost memory, attention, language, reading skills, mathematical patterns, curiosity, preparedness for learning and global intelligences and if so how can this be demonstrated using for example fMRI,EEG with supporting data and images.
Background
Jazzles ELA is a very large music/song powered VAK multimedia program independently researched to boost literacy outcomes/reducing learning times.
Musically animated videos, catchy ‘can’t get it out of your head’ ear-worms/repetunes plus key changes and ‘same language’ subtitles appear to be the major factors.
Educational equity would be the major beneficiary as well as facilitating quality teaching.

See my previous blog Creating Mass Literacy – Overcoming Disadvantage

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7: Memory Strategies Making the Jazzles Difference – But Never Rote!

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How often have parents come up to you and complained their child is ‘bored’ at school?
Somehow it is inferred that it’s the teacher’s responsibility to produce entertaining, educational resources that can compete with today’s interactive games!
In the past perhaps, because teachers were allowed to use their creativity. Today, it’s all about highly prescriptive programs ‘teaching for the test’!

To teach them you must first reach them! How?
Engaging resources! Engaging pedagogical experiences! That’s how I designed Jazzles ELA – so the resources do the heavy lifting, slashing class management issues and creating quality teachiing time.

Embedded Learning Styles
The Jazzles learning system excels in using VAK engagement, but also provides experience opportunities for identifying and developing multiple intelligences!

When you see, laugh, hear, move and sing, you remember everything!
This is the Jazzles claim that is both research based and accepted by every educator. For the first time, these features are integrated into a comprehensive, song-powered, ELA program, designed to accelerate learning in mixed ability classes.

The Jazzles ELA Learning system balances social interaction and interactive technology. That is why Visual and Performing Arts feature highly. Not only do ‘Arts’ experiences develop vocabulary which is the greatest predictor of reading writing success, but all importantly, non cognitive skills of communication, negotiation, creative, inferential and critical thinking, etc.

What about practicing skills?
It’s been proven that children need to practice 16 times to be able to automatically recall. For children with learning difficulties over 40 times.

So how can we get children to want to practice without the boredom of rote?
Jazzles uses multiple, ‘memory-embedded’, practice strategies and resources that are highly engaging and fun!
It’s variety! Variety! Practice! Practice - but practice that is never, ever the same!
Jazzles uniquely keeps children’s learning ‘everyday’ fresh, intriguing and newsworthy for parents!

How?
Each Jazzles ELA Unit starts with its key resource JazzleOke 1 (animated, reading-songs with matching text/captions).

Children automatically join in, to happily practice and learn – because of the:
• Variety of 22 different styles of music over 26 songs! (From ‘Big Band’ to ‘Funk’.)
• Variety of musical backing instrumentation (think kinetic percussion).
• Musical ‘hooks’ – the most powerful mnemonic – that ‘catch’ the ear of the listener.
• Multiple singers – male/ female with solo, duet, trio and unison plus harmonies.
• A wide variety of song topics that interest children with cross curriculum links.
• Lyrical ‘hooks’ – deliberately and prolifically alliterative to ‘hook’ the brain for recall.
• Alliteratively highlighted Matching Captions – synchronized text (reading) to matching images. (Visual Literacy)
• Humor and mischievous cartoon characters – not perfect, but always good or trying to help!

After all this fun practice that activates vocabulary and beginning reading skills, Jazzles Advanced ELA Lesson Plans deliver multiple means of practice using JazzleOke 2 and 3, Interactive JazzleBooks 1 and 2, creative Visual and Performing Arts, and guided play (including interactive games). All of these are scaffolded to reinforce the top indicators of beginning reading and writing (internalized/oral language, phonemic awareness, comprehension and concepts about print).

As one teacher remarked:

“They spontaneously sing the songs when they are working, they talk about it & it helps them find the links with letters & other words.”

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8: How to Easily Catch Up to Reading Levels of Shanghai, HK, Finland, Sweden, S. Korea and Singapore!

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No 8 in 30 Pedagogical Strategies Making the Jazzles Difference

The deliberate integration of the arts into my Jazzles English Arts program creates positive group culture and accelerates literacy skill acquisition. 

Benefits also extend into math (patterns) and non-cognitive skills, including student focus and behavoir.

 Two independent 2008 university supervised studies prove that’s what Jazzles does!

Whether you are a regular or specialist teacher, just by using Jazzles multimedia resources and song-themed lesson plans (especially created for mixed abilities), you can achieve extremely high levels of engagement and ELA learning resulting in superior outcomes.

In 2008, as part of her Masters of Arts Degree, a Missouri kindergarten teacher wrote a thesis focusing on the impact of using music (in effect, Jazzles songs) to improve kindergarten reading levels.  Using tests such as DIBELS, Scott Foresman, Reading Street, Reading A-Z, just under  40% of her class achieved end of year kindergarten literacy levels in the first semester. (Half were entitled to free meals) 

 

Change over 12 weeks in the first semester using Jazzles

Kindergarten student scores achieved over 12 weeks in the first semester using Jazzles

Achieved in 12 weeks of first semester.

Kindergarten student scores achieved over 12 weeks in the  first semester using Jazzles.

“I was astonished,” said the teacher, “to see how much their DIBELS scores improved after incorporating Jazzles!”

Places like Shanghai, Hong Kong, Finland, Sweden, South Korea and Singapore are at the top level of academic achievement for reading, math and science.

What these top achievers have in common, is providing real time for music in the classroom.  Compare this to the tokenism, if any, found in lower performing USA, UK and Australia.

While Jazzles is not a music instruction program, it is the first complete curriculum program to  intelligently uses the attributes of song (automatic, practice, elevated happy emotion, and language memory) and performance, to develop cognitive (especially literacy) and non cognitive skills, including social skills, confidence and focus.

Music/songs engage intellectually and emotionally.  Drama linked to familiar songs provides ‘virtual experiences’ – bringing language to life and opportunity for inferential and creative thinking. Think how powerful a package of skills that is!  Jazzles has it and more!

In the process, Jazzles is helping prepare children for the Conceptual/‘Right Brain’ Age – where it is expected that futures will be determined more by peoples’ abilities to apply creative, holistic and innovative thinking, than logical and linear thinking.

Every Jazzles Unit of song-themed, Lesson Plans with activity pages, interactive games and Visual and Performing Arts activities continue to extend the ‘whole-part-whole’ ELA learning, motivate self initiated learning in other areas!

Click here and download a free Jazzles Advanced ELA Lesson Plan and see how Creative Arts can easily be integrated to power literacy and vital non-cognitive skills.

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Can you integrate rigor with joy to create peak level engaged, active learning?

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Education to Save the World is one of my favorite blogs. Today, they carry an articles “Your Turn: How do you create a joyful classroom?”
I read it with interest because it is missing or understating the concept of rigor.

Rigor sounds the opposite of joy and often is.
So what is rigor and how can you integrate rigor with joy to create engaged, active learning?

Richard W. Strong (2001) defined rigor as “the goal of helping students develop the capacity to understand content that is complex, ambiguous, provocative, and personally or emotionally challenging”. In her (2008) book ‘Rigor is NOT a Four-Letter Word’, Barbara Blackburn’ wrote that “Rigor is creating an environment in which each student is expected to learn at high levels, each student is supported so he or she can learn at high levels, and each student demonstrates learning at high levels.”

In a 2012 whitepaper entitled “How do you identify rigor in the classroom?” Rick Jenkins, Jeff Goldhorn, and Mike Webb wrote: “To teach with rigor is to teach accurately and completely. In order to teach accurately, a teacher must have knowledge of both content and pedagogy. Teachers must teach their content without error and have content knowledge that is deeper than that which they teach. Teaching accurately also implies a use of pedagogy that ensures students learn content for understanding. Content knowledge without pedagogy leads to superficial and short-term learning. Pedagogy without content knowledge can result in student misconceptions and misunderstandings.”

So there’s the challenge! Joy does indeed create engagement. But high engagement may come with very low rigor.
What’s the answer?

You have to create a pedagogy/methodology incorporating the rigor integrated with resources and activities that bring the joy!

With JazzlesELA, I have extensive song–themed resources combining animated, subtitled songs, karaoke and interactive song books enhanced with interactive games and printable activity pages. Scalable lesson plans provide the fun/joy with the rigor.

The program does achieve exceptional results – broadly it halves the time to achieve Common Core Kindergarten ELA outcomes.
Here are a few of my strategies:
• The attention and memory power of music and songs.
• Coral singing to create a happy, unified optimum learning environment.
• Singing to activate a class-wide common, oral vocabulary base (song lyrics) – irrespective of the range vocabulary levels (including ESL) of children entering the class. (Diversity is the biggest challenge in public school classrooms.
• The power of ‘whole /part/ whole’ and contextual teaching for developing reading and writing skills and strategies.
• VAK engagement for optimal learning.
• Creative Visual and Performing Arts.
• Interactive technology.
• Visual Literacy.
• Multiple, fun practice strategies.
• Themed, curriculum extensions.
• Guided and independent learning.
• Pair and group interaction.
How to increase rigor and combine the joy is the real challenge!
With JazzlesELA, you have a best practice case – supported by research.

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Today’s Kids Don’t Have Time on Their Side – Do Something About It Now!

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On July 7, 2013, the New York Times, published an editorial by well respected columnist Paul Krugman, titled ‘Defining Prosperity Down’.
Commenting on latest employment date, he wrote “Full recovery still looks a very long way off. And I’m beginning to worry that it may never happen.”

Growing levels of poverty, lack of certainity and opportunity for our children weighs heavy on the minds of myself and my husband who, figuratively speaking, took pen to paper to write a comment that the NYT published.

Kevin’s end message is not that we need to rethink the role of ‘Arts Integration’, but we need to do it now!!
DoEs, ISDs, politicians (on comfortable salaries), today’s kids don’t have your time on their side. You need to act now!

Here’s what he said:
“Paul, I am afraid long-term unemployment, particularly for disadvantaged, is a reality. It will get worse.
When I grew up I worked for employers like Unilever (Lever Bros) and Interpublc who fostered my career.
Today, its carnage for every employee.

I live in Australia where the average wage is $70,000 but where property values now exceed 10 times earnings. A different type of poverty!
I am not sure of the solution but I do think its foundations is PreK – G1.
We have to create literate kids with confidence – and instill in them the ethos to create their own way to earning money without relying on organization unless they are like COSTCO which do the right things by their employees.

My kids went to top schools, they live very comfortably and I know they look after the people who help them.
Paying garbage wages is a social disgrace but if you look at TV soaps, etc, why would you be surprised!”
Kevin Condon Sydney
TAKE OUT
Arts Integration has the ability to power literacy, build confidence, creativity and instill all children with a positive view of their ability to succeed!
JazzlesELA.com proves it! If you have any doubts, just ask me!

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Generational Poverty Does Not Extinguish Creativity And Why This Is So Important!

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No one disputes generational poverty is inherent and likely to grow.
But as a teacher, we have to cope with the children of generational poverty.
And you know?
We can!
It just depends on the resources and strategies we are given to use.
Assuming the school looks after the hunger, just imagine these kids entering the classroom.
They are stressed, depressed, angry, depressed and oppositional!
Why wouldn’t they be?

What’s the solution?
Arts Integration because it creates joy and inclusion to power whole class engagement and motivation

I use JazzlesELA.com, my own ‘Arts Integrated’ curriculum program.
(In fact, having canvassed every major LinkedIn educational groups and every educational #tag one on Twitter, it appears to be the only one that meets/exceeds Common Core Kindergarten ELA)

From class start, I create a joy-filled classroom with children watching carefully structured animated music videos. They are singing, they are moving, they are creating actions – all for a purpose – memory power. When you see, laugh, hear, move and sing, you remember everything! By following specially formatted prolifically alliterative, phonemic awareness, rich subtitles, they are intuitively developing all six big ideas of reading.

Instead of knocking TV, we borrow familiarized program format properties. Working in groups, children dramatize the sung story becoming weather anchors and news reporters. With karaoke, they’re stars of ‘The Voice’, backing singers or members of air-bands, etc. No guitar but they can all be a Keith Urban!

All of this is building their creativity (which generational poverty does not extinguish) while powering themed, systematically evolving vocabulary and oral language skills. Plus, they are working together in groups learning 21st Century Skills, like co-operation, sharing, being kind to each other.

So, let’s start forgetting children’s backgrounds.

Ask any PreK or Kindergarten class. Can you use a computer? Can you sing? Can you dance? Can you color and paint? Can you pretend to be a slippery snake? Hands will go up everywhere because they are at an age when they can. (Children use the computers to research topics, etc.)

Let’s start using Arts Integration to give these children a sense of purpose and value.
Finally, remember for them to learn, they have to read, and to read they have to have vocabulary.
To adopt a quote by Robert Pondiscio of the Core Knowledge Foundation, generational poverty isn’t destiny, but vocabulary, confidence and creativity definitely will be.

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