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‘The Arts’ of Reading Excellence

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So much emphasis on English and math testing to the annihilation of the arts!
The tide has turned!

All over the country, parents want to know what creative arts programs their children will be offered.
They understand the benefits of creativity through music, art and drama.
Above all, they want their children to be eager to go to school, socialize with their peers, as well as having learning confidence!

Teachers are overwhelmed with overcrowded curricula.
Cut backs have chewed into music, performance and visual arts programs.
But now, even governments are recognizing the positive evidence for including the Arts in schools

But what if Visual and Performing Arts became the medium through which children learn to read, write and communicate?

That’s what Jazzles ELA does. It uses the Arts to absolutely power vocabulary, phonemic awareness, print awareness, letter-sound correspondence, comprehension and fluency through its ‘learn to read’ songs and themed activities.

Jazzles amusing, animated and ‘captioned’ songs, simultaneously engage visually, kinetically and aurally – so every child’s learning style is addressed. Optimized, and mostly intuitive, children are learning all the 6 beginning reading skills through hearing, singing, following the words while performing ‘karaoke (they love that!), miming, dancing and playing percussion instruments to the beat.
Children are interacting socially through choral singing and performance, to learn, automatically and happily, initial sound frequency, high frequency/sight words and grammatical information – all in alliterative, song stories with meaning! It’s all fun practice and never rote.

Afterwards, children collaboratively work in pairs or groups to re-purpose internalized song sentences and research related topics to become script-writers, TV reporters or producers of mini dramas. You can even video these performances for review!
It’s massive, creative engagement – powering contextual vocabulary and oral language delivery – as well as non-cognitive skills of co-operation, performance, confidence and self-esteem.

And after school, brimming with confidence, your students will go home and ‘teach’ their parents and siblings the songs they’ve learned, showing off their word power while explaining the roles they’ve played!
Even if their parents can not functionally read, they can sing a song..
So now there is positive ‘schools to home connect’ with literacy benefits!

Jazzles ELA has a ‘learn to read’ package with over 400 scaffolded, song-themed, interactive resources integrated into its research-based methodology and pedagogy. Two independent theses prove it works at exceptional levels.

We all know the recall-power of music and song!
Just watch American Idol and see the judges sing every memorized word along with the performers!
Music, performance and coral singing engage students. Every teacher understands how beneficial that can be!

Compare Jazzles ELA to other early reading program relying on rote practice and sight word cards!
Which do you think students would rather?

Could marrying Creative Arts with Language Arts be the ultimate solution?

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5: Emotional and Intellectual Cohesion – Strategies Making the Jazzles Difference

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Creating a cohesive group and happy learning environment!
Management issues in mixed groups arise from children with widely differing levels of cognitive and non cognitive skills and learning style profiles. Your mixed ability class almost certainly will also include children from homes under stress.

Music and coral singing creates group unity and makes everyone feel happier. It’s research-proven that when children are happy and not stressed, they can emotionally engage to learn.

Creating group unity and a common vocabulary base
Jazzles ELA helps from day one, by ‘hooking’ children with jazzy music and group singing that lifts spirits.
Coral singing uniquely develops a common oral language framework with high levels of vocabulary. Not only does singing boost language recall, but automatically practices English pitch and pronunciation for those learning English.
This unity and common teaching language framework (song lyrics) means that children learn because they are all on the same page – including the ‘most at risk’.

Every child can learn best working together in a stress-free, happy, learning environment. With the power of music and song to emotionally engage, Jazzles song-themed learning experiences also engage kinesthetically and visually to cater for all learning styles – ensuring optimal learning and minimal behavior management.

With student management minimized, child-teacher relationships thrive and learning accelerates. Jazzles absolutely delivers happy learning. That’s especially important for those disadvantaged by ethnicity and socio-economic backgrounds.

Here’s how a teacher described the impact.

“My assessments were done last month. Letter/sound recognition has increased, along with interest in reading. But what I notice most is the unity that Jazzles bring to the group. They will just be sitting there ready for snack, and they will start singing. That brings tears to my eyes, because they will have fond memories of singing those songs together. They are excited about Jazzles, and ask for it daily. They just love it!”

Tomorrow: So Many Memory Strategies – but never boring rote!

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7: Memory Strategies Making the Jazzles Difference – But Never Rote!

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How often have parents come up to you and complained their child is ‘bored’ at school?
Somehow it is inferred that it’s the teacher’s responsibility to produce entertaining, educational resources that can compete with today’s interactive games!
In the past perhaps, because teachers were allowed to use their creativity. Today, it’s all about highly prescriptive programs ‘teaching for the test’!

To teach them you must first reach them! How?
Engaging resources! Engaging pedagogical experiences! That’s how I designed Jazzles ELA – so the resources do the heavy lifting, slashing class management issues and creating quality teachiing time.

Embedded Learning Styles
The Jazzles learning system excels in using VAK engagement, but also provides experience opportunities for identifying and developing multiple intelligences!

When you see, laugh, hear, move and sing, you remember everything!
This is the Jazzles claim that is both research based and accepted by every educator. For the first time, these features are integrated into a comprehensive, song-powered, ELA program, designed to accelerate learning in mixed ability classes.

The Jazzles ELA Learning system balances social interaction and interactive technology. That is why Visual and Performing Arts feature highly. Not only do ‘Arts’ experiences develop vocabulary which is the greatest predictor of reading writing success, but all importantly, non cognitive skills of communication, negotiation, creative, inferential and critical thinking, etc.

What about practicing skills?
It’s been proven that children need to practice 16 times to be able to automatically recall. For children with learning difficulties over 40 times.

So how can we get children to want to practice without the boredom of rote?
Jazzles uses multiple, ‘memory-embedded’, practice strategies and resources that are highly engaging and fun!
It’s variety! Variety! Practice! Practice - but practice that is never, ever the same!
Jazzles uniquely keeps children’s learning ‘everyday’ fresh, intriguing and newsworthy for parents!

How?
Each Jazzles ELA Unit starts with its key resource JazzleOke 1 (animated, reading-songs with matching text/captions).

Children automatically join in, to happily practice and learn – because of the:
• Variety of 22 different styles of music over 26 songs! (From ‘Big Band’ to ‘Funk’.)
• Variety of musical backing instrumentation (think kinetic percussion).
• Musical ‘hooks’ – the most powerful mnemonic – that ‘catch’ the ear of the listener.
• Multiple singers – male/ female with solo, duet, trio and unison plus harmonies.
• A wide variety of song topics that interest children with cross curriculum links.
• Lyrical ‘hooks’ – deliberately and prolifically alliterative to ‘hook’ the brain for recall.
• Alliteratively highlighted Matching Captions – synchronized text (reading) to matching images. (Visual Literacy)
• Humor and mischievous cartoon characters – not perfect, but always good or trying to help!

After all this fun practice that activates vocabulary and beginning reading skills, Jazzles Advanced ELA Lesson Plans deliver multiple means of practice using JazzleOke 2 and 3, Interactive JazzleBooks 1 and 2, creative Visual and Performing Arts, and guided play (including interactive games). All of these are scaffolded to reinforce the top indicators of beginning reading and writing (internalized/oral language, phonemic awareness, comprehension and concepts about print).

As one teacher remarked:

“They spontaneously sing the songs when they are working, they talk about it & it helps them find the links with letters & other words.”

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A fun, new, ‘learn to read’ methodology for disadvantaged children?

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Can every child (including ESL, SPED and socio-economic disadvantaged children) experience beginning reading success?

Is there a new ‘learn to read’, multimedia approach that engages the spectrum of learning needs in every mixed ability class?

Interested? Test it out!
Digital/visual media, music, singing and movement engage today’s children.

The Jazzles ELA’s unique ‘learn to read’ methodology uses all these features to emotionally and intellectually engage beginning readers.

Together, they create optimal, simultaneous visual, aural and kinetic engagement by catering for every child’s preferred learning style profile.

Using supporting themed resources and visual and performing arts, Jazzles creates fun, interactive social and digital experiences that provides multiple forms of practice to consolidate skills without the dreaded ‘drill and kill’ that annihilates any learning/ teaching joy!

Try It! Why Not?
Your free, Jazzles ‘Blue Bus Blues’ Unit download allows you test levels of joy and engagement with your students, and explore how the Jazzles song-powered ELA program works.

Its key resource – JazzleOke 1 - shows how the 6 beginning ‘learn to read’ skills (Letter-Sound Correspondence, Phonemic Awareness, Vocabulary, Comprehension, Fluency and Concepts about Print) are acquired intuitively through fun visual, aural and kinesthetic interaction.

Can Jazzles unique ‘learn to read’ methodology be a life-changing, ‘beginning reading success’ solution for teachers with disadvantaged children in mixed ability classes ?
Let me know what you think.

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10: Defying challenges of word deficits, word knowledge, even books and pencils!

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Number 10 in My Series – Strategies Making the Jazzles Difference

Here’s why the Jazzles ELA methodology is so different to any other early reading/ ELA program you have experienced.
“…a committee of nationally recognized professors and educators, seeking to bring some sense to the arguments over the best way of teaching reading, produced a report that said no single reading instruction method, used in isolation, works best for all children. The report by the National Research Council recommended that teachers use a mix of phonics and creative exercises.” — The Washington Post 1998 (Book Review of ‘Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children’ by Catherine E. Snow, M. Susan Burns, and Peg Griffin) June 2010

Jazzles ELA absolutely follows that recommendation.

I’ve designed the program to include over 50 substantive instructional strategies to help children learn skills they need to defy the challenges of word deficits, word knowledge and even, as in New Canton, Virginia, children too poor to experience even books and pencils.

The more Reading Strategies children are able to use, the easier it will be for them to read new text successfully.

These strategies include applying meaning, internalized language knowledge (vocabulary) and phonemic awareness skills.

With Jazzles ELA, children are taught never to rely on only one of these skills but how to use two or even three strategies to successfully decode and correct mistakes.

Once learned, these strategies will become tools that are eventually applied automatically – as when they graduate to independent readers.

For example, the following strategies used simultaneously help children decode an unknown word in an illustrated book. Children can:
• Use the initial sound/letter of the word (phonemic awareness).
• Use the illustration (for meaning).
• Consider what word would fit naturally into the sentence ( internalized knowledge of the structure of English sentences).

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A Turning Point!

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Here’s another ‘changing children’s lives’ feedback received on FaceBook:
“Really looking forward to this years Jazzles as my Junior Team kids in my school loved it. It was the turning point for some children with their reading.”
Keep them coming!

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Nothing matches Jazzles for learning styles!

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I love the feedback from our teachers. Here’s one from a teacher who works across PREK-G1 including ESL.
She covers today’s biggest educational challenge – mixed ability classes – and the importance of Jazzles with its VAK learning styles and engaging pedagogy.

“Here we are again – another semester and Jazzles too!
I use Jazzles all day and if I had my way I’d use only Jazzles but we have to use other stuff to!
Nothing else matches Jazzles for the multiple styles of learning it encompasses.
Along with recording the results on ESGI, I think it makes a HUGE difference!
This year we have younger children – lots of English as second language, speech problems, no English and low socioeconomic backgrounds.
So they are 3 and have come with very limited knowledge of colours, shapes, letters, their own names, listening, manners.
I spent most of the last day of the 2011-2012 school year in tears.
The parents were so lovely in all the words they said.
One dad cried too! They were so appreciative of how far their children had come and the fun they had with Jazzles and they all loved the regular Friday afternoon karoake (JazzleOke Friday) shows.
I’ve been teaching for a while now & I recommend Jazzles to everyone I meet!
Thought you’d like to know.”

Note: Jazzles is great for parent nights! Lots of parents end up in tears!

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