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Who’s developing a sequential, ‘arts and technology’ integrated, multimedia 21st century ELA program?

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Seems everyone wants the engagement power and educational benefits of Arts plus Technology.

Why?

Because, apart from the 3 R’s, we teachers need to cater for all learning styles and multiple intelligences while also developing non-cognitive skills, and keeping it all entertaining to engage every student!

Combining the Arts with the cost effectiveness and the engagement levels of on-line internet delivery, just adds to the benefits!

Now I’m all for research- based information that leads to change and developing practical resources that meet educational needs. But it seems that there is too much analyzing, too many committees gathering information and too little money spent on program-resourced solutions!

We have researched and found the flaws, heard the experts.
Where are the solutions?

Why aren’t more experienced, mature teachers asked to contribute from their wealth of practical knowledge and experience? I’m sure many retired teachers would love to be asked to share their wealth of wisdom.

Meanwhile generations of children are lost in inappropriate, outdated programs. Endless blame-gaming and talk has failed them.

AND don’t blame the teachers.
The solution needs to start by equipping teachers in teachers colleges and already in schools – but please give them the sequential program, methodology, and engaging resources children today are expecting.

Let’s look at the evidence in the NCTQ’s May 2006 Report ‘What Education Schools Aren’t Teaching about Reading and What Elementary Teachers Aren’t Learning

Finding No 1: ‘MOST EDUCATION SCHOOLS ARE NOT TEACHING THE SCIENCE OF READING’ (Page 4).
Finding No 9: ‘NO AGREEMENT IN THE FIELD ABOUT WHAT CONSTITUTES ‘SEMINAL’ TEXTS’ (Page 12).

‘Another problem is fragmentation in the field of reading instruction. In contrast to most other fields, where professionals generally agree on a core of seminal texts, no single reading text, no matter what its approach, was assigned in more than a handful of the courses we examined, and only a tiny fraction of texts were read in more than a single class. Teacher educators clearly have not reached any sort of consensus about a single scholar or text that serves as essential reading in the field. In truth, the field is a free-for-all.’
SOURCE: National Council on Teacher Quality May 2006 Report.

Not so using the JazzlesELA ‘learn to read’ method that involves simultaneously learning the 5 necessary components of good reading instruction (as identified in the review of research by the National Reading Panel report released in 2000), while also learning Concepts about Print and practicing oral English!

My sequential JazzlesELA/ESL multimedia program is designed for the beginning of Elementary school. One of its extraordinary strengths is achieving very high levels of engagement in mixed ability classes through the integration of Arts and Technology.

If you can’t reach them, can you teach them?
Click this link and test for yourself the effectiveness of a ‘relatable’ arts-integrated, multimedia program!

At the very least, you will discover that Jazzles ELA offers every child the opportunity of a happy, confident start to school with a unique, 21st century, arts-integrated, multimedia ‘learn to read’ approach.

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2: Ear-Worms – Strategies Making the Jazzles Difference!

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As a teacher, I have designed every aspect of the Jazzles program to do the heavy lifting in terms of VAK engagement, internalization and recall.

So What does the lifting?
Jazzles uses song-power and performance to engage VAK learning.
Think of it as the ‘American Idol’ for literacy!
Technically Jazzles is full of songs that are scientifically described as ‘ear-worms’. These are defined as ‘a piece of music that gets stuck in your head so you hear it, even when it is not being played’.

Jazzles Ear-Worms – a Huge Difference to Any Other ELA Program!
Uniquely, Jazzles applies ‘ear-worms’ strategically and comprehensively to English Language Arts’. The ear-worms are specifically composed to target beginning reading skills and oral language using my interactive reading songs resource – JazzleOke 1.

As explained yesterday, here’s one example of an ear-worm benefit. When a child is struggling in reading, they can automatically remember the sounds of the letters by recalling the songs – even when it is not being played. Another very strong benefit is predictive reading skills – developing at an early age the ability to predict in advance the most likely next word(s) in a sentence or phrase before actually reading them.
For example, ‘wake up‘, ‘love my‘, ‘lots of‘.
Without predictive reading skills, children will labor in reading and understanding. Predictive reading skills are also essential for our ESL/ELL students.

As research shows, with ear-worms, we are able to hear a song perfectly within memory. The ear may not necessarily be hearing the music, but the brain will hear it perceptually.

Ear-Worms, Phonemic Awareness and Mnemonics
Leaving animation aside, Jazzles songs are prolifically alliterative.
Children love alliteration that, especially in songs, acts as a very powerful language mnemonic, particularly in developing oral vocabulary, phonological awareness and alphabetic principle – 3 of the 5 most important predictors of future literacy success.

Every time students, interact with a JazzleOke 1, they are seeing, hearing, singing, moving, tapping, performing, dramatizing, creating actions or playing a percussion instrument to the beat.
So every child’s learning style profile is engaged for maximum learning.
They are intuitively learning the 6 big ideas learning to read and happily practicing oral English!
What other literacy/ESL program has children eagerly and happily practicing?

“My kindergarten students sing along with the Jazzles songs constantly and I was astonished
to see how much their (DIBELS, Scott Foresman Reading Street and Reading A-Z) scores improved after incorporating the JAZZLES songs. Using actions helps with the total brain stimulation and actually rote memorization as well.”
TOMORROW
The ‘Big Picture’ Jazzles Difference!
Note: Please help me. I’ve self-funded Jazzles ELA. So please send the link to your colleagues, principal, curriculum director and your friends!

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Do You Know of Any ‘Arts Integrated’ Multimedia ELA Curriculum Program for Kindergarten?

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As part of a procurement process, an important government agency has asked us for the names of any competitors to our JazzlesELA program so they can compare resources and pricing.
We are genuinely unaware of any – so I would appreciate your help.

Program Description
JazzlesELA is a complete ‘Arts Integrated’ (or ‘Arts in Education’) program that is fully digitally delivered.
Essentially, the program is a ‘kindergarten-in-the-box’ package containing a fully developed ‘Arts Integrated’ pedagogy, methodology and SCORM compliant LMS resources – including over 500 sequenced, themed, song-powered animations, games and printable activity sheets.

JazzlesELA caters for all VAK-T/learning styles. It features multiple mnemonic strategies based on the Arts – including singing, dance, drama, art and performance.

Meeting/exceeding Common Core State Standards Kindergarten ELA, the supporting 26 Lesson Plans feature advanced ELA strategies that can also be used for Professional Development. For example, how to teach vocabulary, phonemic awareness, creative writing, etc.

Behind all the program’s laughter and fun, there is ‘academic rigor’ tailored appropriately to kindergarten. This claim is supported by two independent theses that demonstrate the program’s potential to overcome 50 years of literacy failure and turn the majority of our children into proficient, even advanced, readers.

You can download the theses from this link I think you will find some astonishing results

Transforming traditional play based learning into 21st Century learning, the program engages mixed diversity classes (including SPED and ESL) at exceptional levels – close to 100%.

While it has very many similarities to A+ schools and Reggio Emilia, it is highly scalable with very easy teacher in-servicing.

The program’s core focus is developing an active vocabulary/oral language base as the precursor to successful reading and learning.

Along with developing all six big ideas of beginning reading, JazzlesELA uses ‘arts integration’ to also develop essential non-cognitive skills such as co-operation, sharing, curiosity, confidence and self esteem.

This government procurement inquiry is a major opportunity for us.
I hope you can help.
Even a ‘no knowledge’ answer would be much appreciated.
lesleybeth@jazzles.com

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Sneaky Learning

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Watch the video!
So many of you are asking “Who are the Jazzles?”, I’ve YouTube’d a recording session!
I was delighted to hear that in the remote village of Ngukurr on the Roper River, in the Northern Territory of Australia, ‘Sneaky Snake’ is a favorite among Aboriginal children because The Rainbow Serpent (Snake) is an important part of the beliefs and culture of many of their peoples.
Of course this song is animated.
Every time it is watched and performed, the kids go off to play doing what sneaky snakes do!
Lots of fun.
More important, lots of social interaction!!

Key Point
I was tempted to let you just enjoy our singers but watching their moves, I had to add some captions to explain that the songs are not just ordinary ‘hearing’ songs.
Every song is an ‘ear-wormed’ mini literacy package (meaning it gets stuck in your head!).
The video gives you a hint of how to use but my Lesson Plans guide you step-by-step. Reading these you will see how they incorporate advanced ELA strategies that cater for every child’s learning styles.
No worries (as we say in Australia), it’s all embedded.

So…
Look at the video and be teased about all the things you can do with resources like this.
The kids won’t even realize their learning.
Sneaky!
Watch the video!

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10: Defying challenges of word deficits, word knowledge, even books and pencils!

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Number 10 in My Series – Strategies Making the Jazzles Difference

Here’s why the Jazzles ELA methodology is so different to any other early reading/ ELA program you have experienced.
“…a committee of nationally recognized professors and educators, seeking to bring some sense to the arguments over the best way of teaching reading, produced a report that said no single reading instruction method, used in isolation, works best for all children. The report by the National Research Council recommended that teachers use a mix of phonics and creative exercises.” — The Washington Post 1998 (Book Review of ‘Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children’ by Catherine E. Snow, M. Susan Burns, and Peg Griffin) June 2010

Jazzles ELA absolutely follows that recommendation.

I’ve designed the program to include over 50 substantive instructional strategies to help children learn skills they need to defy the challenges of word deficits, word knowledge and even, as in New Canton, Virginia, children too poor to experience even books and pencils.

The more Reading Strategies children are able to use, the easier it will be for them to read new text successfully.

These strategies include applying meaning, internalized language knowledge (vocabulary) and phonemic awareness skills.

With Jazzles ELA, children are taught never to rely on only one of these skills but how to use two or even three strategies to successfully decode and correct mistakes.

Once learned, these strategies will become tools that are eventually applied automatically – as when they graduate to independent readers.

For example, the following strategies used simultaneously help children decode an unknown word in an illustrated book. Children can:
• Use the initial sound/letter of the word (phonemic awareness).
• Use the illustration (for meaning).
• Consider what word would fit naturally into the sentence ( internalized knowledge of the structure of English sentences).

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Neuroeducation specialist wanted to test Jazzles ELA Conceptual Model.

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We are trying to find a neuroscientist / neuroeducation specialist to research why the Jazzles ELA program  and conceptual model achieves boosts in learning and reading skills.  
Educational equity would be the major beneficiary as well as facilitating quality teaching.
If you know of any institute or PHD who would be interested, please let me know.
Sincerely
Lesley Beth 
lesleybeth@jazzles.com
The Brief
Does the conceptual framework and the pedagogical methodology approach typified by Jazzles ELA boost memory, attention, language, reading skills, mathematical patterns, curiosity, preparedness for learning and global intelligences and if so how can this be demonstrated using for example fMRI,EEG with supporting data and images.
Background
Jazzles ELA is a very large music/song powered VAK multimedia program independently researched to boost literacy outcomes/reducing learning times.
Musically animated videos, catchy ‘can’t get it out of your head’ ear-worms/repetunes plus key changes and ‘same language’ subtitles appear to be the major factors.
Educational equity would be the major beneficiary as well as facilitating quality teaching.

See my previous blog Creating Mass Literacy – Overcoming Disadvantage

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What Can Be Done When ONLY 12% of Black Boys are on Grade Level?

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The figure of 12% is to be found in Dr. Jawanza Kunjufu’s recently released book – ‘Understanding Black Male Learning Styles’ – in which he says, “Understanding black male learning styles is critical to academic success.”

Which takes us to today Thursday 11th April, Dr. Yvette Jackson will be the keynote speaker at the NYC DOE EMPOWERING BOYS INITIATIVE (Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture).

Here Dr. Jackson will present research supporting her ‘Pedagogy of Confidence: Inspiring High Intellectual Performance in Urban Schools‘.

The essence is that high intellectual performance can be achieved when instruction and classroom environment are modified to include culturally relevant strategies through High Operational Practices that fortify the cognitive skills necessary for all students to meet the demands of the Common Core State Standards.

I Blend Research and Classroom Practice!
My Jazzles ELA program is built on research, focusing particularly on VAK-T learning styles and mnemonics. But some times I think research gets more attention than solutions.

So here’s this blog’s takeout!
There is a solution for Black American boys in PreK-G2. It’s called Jazzles ELA.
It is based on decades of practical classroom experiences and the oft forgotten, old time teacher skills, of ingenuity and creativity!
(Sadly replaced these days by committee-based prescriptive pedagogies.)

Using Jazzles ELA, schools will significantly reverse 50 years of failed resources and pedagogies to achieve consistently high levels of reading proficiency among our most disadvantaged.

As Eli Broad (@UnreasonableEli), says in a current tweet ‘Anyone in any line of work can use “Why Not?” to make small but significant changes in day-today operations’.

So my little request to Dr Jackson, Dr. Kunjufu, and all schools experiencing this issue, is:
Why not review Jazzles ELA in the toughest school you can ‘throw’ at me?
All I need is 1-2 weeks, an Interactive Whiteboard, some photocopy paper and art materials.
(Notes: You’ll see an impact on day 1. Doesn’t need much teacher training, because Jazzles is essentially ‘intuitive’.)

Summary
Dr. Yvette Jackson’s is the ‘Pedagogy of Confidence’.
Mine is the ‘Pedagogy of Engagement‘.
Through it’s pedagogy, particularly teaching from what is known, children acquire confidence because risks of failure are effectively removed. (See my very next blog!!)

How Jazzles caters for Black American boys – without losing the girls (or anyone else!).

BLACK AMERICAN Students
Movement and rhythm components are vital – along with the full battery of Jazzles resources and strategies. This includes:
• Kinesthetic/tactile experiences.
• Processing visual information.
• Opportunities for expressive creativity (e.g. oral expression).
• Nonverbal communication (including intonation, body language, dance and drama, etc.).

Important strategies include working with background music playing (a key Jazzles language practice strategy) and creating an environment that encourages harmony, cooperation, and socialization.

Jazzles embeds all these strategies in its resources and pedagog

BOYS

Stunning!
Says New York Times Best Selling author Michael Gurian ( ‘The Minds of Boys’).

Jazzles resources and pedagogy is embedded with differentiated instruction strategies that create boy friendly classrooms – while still engaging the girls, both sexes at extraordinary levels.
For boys,Jazzles is full of experiential single-task focus projects and visual-spatial/body-kinesthetic learning, the latter catering for boys’ natural desire to move.

LOW SES
The Jazzles pedagogy tackles all the core challenges these students face including lack of vocabulary, general knowledge, self-confidence as well as behavioral and emotional problems. Features include:
• Jazzles ELA is a multifaceted program that enables children to experience and practice learning in a multitude of different ways. For example, a key vocabulary strategy is to use the JazzleOke cartoons to power language rich conversations, drama and topic exploration.
• By focusing on one JazzleOke theme a week, children rapidly develop a common class-wide language base familiar to every child. This enables every child, advantaged and disadvantaged, to join-in happily.
• Week by week, low SES students incrementally develop their language base, general knowledge, their confidence and the joy of learning cooperatively.
• With Jazzles, there are frequent, varied, and extensive language experiences through its directed listening and discussion strategies.
• This includes the role of rich language. Around 5% of Jazzles lyrics are composed of ‘big/unfamiliar’ words – like ‘astronaut’, ‘astonished’ and ‘outstretched’. These big words are the ones children find easiest to remember while also fostering word consciousness.
• For low SES students, song-powered Jazzles brightens their day with happiness and joy. It also provides unique opportunities to engage families in their children’s education, and in the process improve literacy standards in the home.

Re Other Groups
For Hispanic, REGED, SPED, ESL/EFL refer to Equity for All on my website.

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