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3: ‘Whole-Part-Whole’ Learning – Strategies Making the Jazzles Difference

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This is possibly the most important blog about Jazzles ELA. If you understand this, you ‘get’ Jazzles ELA!

The Jazzles learning system uses a ‘whole-part-whole’ learning approach.
We know from experience that if we first see the complete image for a jigsaw, we have a framework and valuable information upon which we can fit the pieces together.

Mixed Ability Classes and the Applicability of Whole-Part-Whole/Global Processing
This is all about embedding learning styles within a pedagogy fully integrated with resource to meet the needs of today’s diverse student intake.

The Jazzles ELA program is rich in kinesthetic and tactual-kinesthetic experiences appropriate for ‘global thinkers’ preferring ‘whole-part-whole’ processing.
This benefits three core student groups in mixed ability classes:
1. Research substantiates that most Special Education children are global processors, with tactual and kinesthetic-perceptual strengths (Kyriacou & Dunn, 1994).
2. This is also true for Hispanic Americans/Asian Americans/ and EFL/ESL including most Asian students (Dunn & Griggs, 1995). Also the majority of children today are visual/kinesthetic learners. (See also #3)
3. Critically importantly for African-Americans, particularly boys. Acknowledged African-American Educational expert, Dr. Jawanza Kunjufu estimates that as many as two-thirds of students and an even larger percentage of African American males are visual-picture, oral/auditory, and tactile/kinesthetic learners (right-brain). However, most of the learning activities are oriented toward visual-print learners (left-brain). According to Dr. Kunjufu, this conflict between pedagogy and Black male learning styles has created a disastrous learning environment for right-brain students, and it must be resolved if Black boys are to improve their classroom performance. (Source: www.africanamericanimages.com)

Meeting the engagement demands of this diversity of children to activate learning is what is so spectacular about Jazzles ELA. No other program does it.

It is true that the process of reading involves the application of more than 1 skill simultaneously. In the past, learning to read involved teaching beginning reading skills often in isolation, and then incorporating them.

Jazzles’ new, song-powered approach is to first emotionally engage children with ‘whole’ text in the engaging form of JazzleOke 1. From then on, every fun, visual, kinaesthetic and aural interaction with this unique resource is the framework for an intuitive, ‘learn to read’ tutorial’!

This is why I encourage everyone to download Jazzles ‘Blue Bus Blues’ Unit to test and explore the themed lesson plans, ‘arts’ activities and interactive experiences. This way you can fully appreciate why both students and teachers love this ‘whole-part-whole’ processing program.

Here’s how!
With every JazzleOke 1 experience, children are simultaneously learning the 6 beginning reading skills while practicing oral vocabulary.

Check how children will process these 6 beginning reading skills as they watch JazzleOke1 ‘Blue Bus Blues’.
• Letter/sound and upper/lowercase correspondence, (Alphabetic Principle)
• Initial sound fluency (Phonemic Awareness)
• Understanding words in context/ visual literacy (Comprehension)
• Internalized English language knowledge (Vocabulary)
• Pronunciation, intonation and phrasing(Fluency)
• L-R tracking , one to one correspondence, use of punctuation (Concepts about Print)

From the mental scaffolding of an internalized language (lyric) framework, students have learning purpose to ‘take out’ sight and spelling words, unusual phonemes, grammatical information and punctuation. Etc. Learned words and language information can then be applied purposefully in communication, reading, and writing.

When JazzleOke I is transformed into the ‘whole’ text as in JazzleBook 2 or in JazzleOke 3, it’s a simple step to experience initial reading success!

This is why I am excited – especially when receive feedback about children effortlessly developing vocabulary and beginning reading confidence that can mean the crucial difference between future failure or success.

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9: Phonemic Awareness Skills – What Education Schools Aren’t Teaching!

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Number 9 in My Series – Strategies Making the Jazzles Difference
In May 2006, the National Council on Teacher Quality published an extensive report on ‘What Education Schools Aren’t Teaching About Reading’.

It found that “the two ‘newest’ components of good reading instruction — phonemic awareness and fluency— were broached in the fewest classes, just one in 20 education schools. In contrast, phonics, long the linchpin of reading, was taught in one out of seven classes, with slightly more frequency than comprehension, arguably the hallmark component for the whole language approach.”

Providing Support for Elementary Teachers
Unlike nearly every other PreK-G1 resource, Jazzles focuses on developing phonemic awareness skills via songs that are prolifically alliterative (the repetition of the same initial sound in several words in connected text). Children love alliteration because it is ‘tongue-twisting’ and memorable.

Over 40,000 YouTube Plays

Over 40,000 YouTube Plays

Click to Play and see alliteration in action!

Strong Mnemonic Aid
Alliteration is also a key component of the Jazzles multiple memory strategies.
Research shows that it is more probable that children will consistently remember expressions that alliterate than those that don’t.  This appears to be almost intuitive.

Phonemic awareness is the strongest predictor of reading success – more highly related to reading development than intelligence, reading readiness, and listening comprehension (Stanovich, 1986,1994). Jazzles lyrics excel at developing the phonemic awareness skill of initial sound fluency.

Two independent theses (2008) using Jazzles Songs support its effectiveness. See Previous Post

What’s the Take-Out?
Jazzles ELA not only provides the resources that engage children to intuitively develop their phonemic awareness skills, it also provides the teachers with how to teach it using the Jazzles ELA Advanced Lesson Plans!

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Using ‘Whole-Part-Whole’ processing to teach the structure of a ‘Narrative’ text

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Here’s an actual classroom experience demonstrating the value my ‘Whole-Part-Whole’ approach. (See number 3 in the Jazzles Advantage Series.)

Whole
I used the Jazzles ELA ‘Fat Fish’ animated song, with its Matching Captions, to teach year 1 and 2 students the structure of a ‘narrative’.
This ‘song’ story clearly demonstrates an ‘Orientation’, ‘Sequence of Events’, ‘Complication’ and ‘Resolution’.

By repeated singing with actions and percussion-playing to the ‘Fat Fish’ JazzleOke 1, students were thoroughly immersed in the vocabulary of the lyrics.
They understood it and could recall it.

Students then had enormous fun, by taking turns miming the human characters, the flies, seagulls, palm trees and ocean waves to the audio backing of the song.

This dramatic performance consolidated the sequence order of the story and its comprehension.

Part
We discussed the structure of a ‘Narrative‘ in terms of this story.
Then in pairs, children were given 4 images to sequence. They discussed and then matched them with ‘Orientation‘, ‘Complication‘ and ‘Resolution‘ labels.

Next, I made 5 sentence strips (only very slightly adjusting the text to include character names).

Together we read them out loud, and I had to smile as the children automatically broke into song. They began singing the familiarized vocabulary they were reading!
Those who may have struggled if they couldn’t read the text, were free to concentrate on the literacy purpose of this activity!

Whole
Again in pairs, students cut out the sentences, arranged them to match the images, and then read the whole text.
Outcome!
I don’t believe that those children will ever forget how to construct a ‘Narrative’.

Importance
“..studies in the 1980s and 1990s have suggested that there is little reading comprehension instruction in schools…. We desperately need to understand why many teachers do not focus directly on comprehension strategies and routines, and we need to learn more about how to help teachers provide good comprehension instruction.”

“The early work documented the significance of attention to text structure, pointing out that students who are…more knowledgeable about text structure recall more textual information than those less knowledgeable…. It also suggested that knowledge is not enough; students must actually follow the text’s structure in building their recall in order for the effect to be realized; not surprisingly, more good than poor readers are inclined to do so.”
(‘Effective Practices for Developing Reading Comprehension’ Duke, Nell and Pearson)

Take-Out!
“A central question is,” asks Duke, Nell and Pearson, “how can and should teachers embed all these research-documented practices into a curriculum?”
As you can see Jazzles ELA is a great start! The basis is all in the Lesson Plans – that’s why we call them ‘Advanced ELA’!

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11. U.S. students struggle with vocabulary! Why The Jazzles Vocabulary Approach IS the NAEP’s Vocabulary Approach!

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Number 11 in My Series – Strategies Making the Jazzles Difference
‘U.S. students struggle with vocabulary’, says a new study from the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics.
The same article adds ‘Vocabulary skills of students nationwide closely track students’ reading comprehension levels.’

So where do we go from doomsday?
Commenting on the research, Francie Alexander, Vice President and Chief Academic Officer for Scholastic Education, says the results show that developing a rich vocabulary “can become a huge task for students, one that schools must take on beginning in the earliest grades and continuing through high school.”

Does Vocabulary Development Have to be a Huge Task?
Certainly not! With Jazzles, children acquire vocabulary knowledge intuitively, easily and almost automatically, through the combination of:
1. Highly engaging, song themed, vocabulary rich resources.
2. The use of multiple mnemonic-based strategies to power vocabulary development – e.g. Matching Captions; prolific alliteration: developing vocabulary using connected text; lyrics emphasizing nearly 75% of words found in high fluency and sight word lists; creative writing using storyboarding; etc.
3. The use of creative arts for reinforcing and extending vocabulary and comprehension. For example, the use of drama and creative play to develop expressive vocabulary and oral skills.

Benefits go beyond developing vocabulary and comprehension, because when children know a word and are then asked to use it in a phonological awareness exercise, they will find the task easier than if they had to use an unfamiliar word.
See footnote: Research shows that, as in Jazzles ELA, musical and phonemic processing interact.

If every child had access to Jazzles ELA, I can tell you this.
Jazzles is absolutely ‘guaranteed’ to build your students knowledge not only of most of the words they need to know, but also hundreds of words that add sparkle to their texts!

As Headstart teacher Judy Toscano of San Antonio confirms (2013):

“As for how former students are doing, the Pre-k 4 teachers and the kindergarten teachers can see a huge difference between my students that have used Jazzles and other students that have not. They demonstrate a more advanced vocabulary and have letter names and letter sounds more developed. My students also show better scores on the assessments we administer then the other pre-3 classes on my campus.

Here’s the Jazzles Quick Guide to Oral Language Development!
Jazzles fosters vocabulary using group/choral singing supported by song-themed discussion topics, and visual and performing arts experiences.
1. The Jazzles animated song stories achieve high levels of intellectual and emotional engagement.
2. The content of each song story is both highly relevant but more importantly ‘relatable’ – perhaps best defined by Tracy Johnson, one of America’s top media audience programmers, as ” .. turning content into connective communication that resonates with the audience.”
3. The story content ignites curiosity that children can immediately explore using the Google and Bing (Maps and Video) toolbar embedded into our user interface.
4. The Jazzles Advanced ELA Lesson Plans provide teachers with discussion topics that achieve very high levels of student interest and interaction.
5. Widespread participation is achieved because, having related to the song animations, children are familiar with the ‘plot’. This creates the interest and self-confidence to share their knowledge and real-life experiences. This is especially important for ESL students.

The Jazzles Vocabulary Approach IS the NAEP Vocabulary Approach

“The results come from the biennial National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), commonly called The Nation’s Report Card.
The NAEP vocabulary test demanded more high-order, abstract thinking from students, inviting them to use the context of a passage to figure out words’ meanings instead of simply asking them to define words in isolation.” Says USA Today.

That’s exactly what Jazzles does!
You would be amazed at all the creativity generated when children become TV reporters, weather anchors, ‘witnesses’ etc.!

I get children to work in pairs or small groups, planning an interview, creating a storyboard, playing a role, developing a story or dramatic performance related to the animated song story!

From the very first time they sing along to the Jazzles animated stories (JazzleOke 1), you can see just how fast and naturally students develop not only their oral vocabulary but also their communication and cooperative skills!
As a teacher, I just love their confident report-backs and group interactions!

Try It! Why Not?
Are you struggling because of vocabulary deficits, particularly with the disadvantaged?
Why not just test Jazzles in your classroom?
Just click the link to download and install the Jazzles ELA demo unit – ‘Blue Bus Blues’ (38Mb – no information required – includes uninstall.exe) – and then experience the Jazzles’ power to develop vocabulary and listening skills in real-time!

Start by referencing page 2 of the Advanced ELA Lesson Plans.
Here, you can see the structured Inferential, Literal and Evaluative Question prompts suggested. Now just add/tailor your own!

As Core Knowledge founder E.D. Hirsch Jr. says “Students don’t learn new words by studying vocabulary lists. They do so by guessing new meanings within the overall gist of what they are hearing or reading.”

Note:
Research shows that musical and phonemic processing interact – benefiting attention span, comprehension and memory. Source: ‘The Effect of Harmonic Context on Phoneme Monitoring in Vocal Music’’ National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine USA Also The Relationship of Lyrics and Tunes in the Processing of Unfamiliar Songs: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Adaptation Study’ The Society for Neuroscience

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Teachers: Will We Ever Learn? And What I’m Doing About It!

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‘Teachers: Will We Ever Learn?’ is a headline in yesterday’s New York Times. Click here to open.

It’s a great article by Jal Mehta, an assistant professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and the author of the forthcoming book “The Allure of Order: High Hopes, Dashed Expectations, and the Troubled Quest to Remake American Schooling.”

He says in one paragraph: “… what happens in classrooms, hasn’t changed much in the century since the Progressive Era. On the whole, we still have the same teachers, in the same roles, with the same level of knowledge, in the same schools, with the same materials, and much the same level of parental support.”

Professor Mehta, not for the want of trying!
Unlike Sir Ken Robinson et al, there’s little point in complaining about lack of creativity in schools. I’ve sold my house to create and fund a totally new 21st Century Engagement Pedagogy designed to cater for VAK-T learning styles – using new ground breaking pedagogical resources.

Dianne Ravitch may not support the Common Core Standards. I do, because it provides a benchmark upon which DoE’s and ISDs can judge materials – mine included. And guess what, Jazzles ELA will beat any other PreK to K program hands down and meet/exceed CCSS ELA for Kindergarten!

So what am going to do about it today??
I’m taking time off to work out a new strategy as to how I can get DoEs, ISDs and Principals to say, in the words of Eli Broad, “Why not?” as in “Lesley Beth is claiming all these things about how her program is solving issues of engaging mixed ability PreK-G1 classes. Is it fact or garbage?”

Well just two weeks trying out Jazzles in a class would tell you. So why not try it??
As I said in previous blog, give me your toughest PreK-G1, and I’ll show you how I can engage, manage and motivate them! What’s the risk? NOTHING!
Except you might turn upside down the theories and resources of yesterday.

I’m Going Bush!
So for the next 10 days, I’m going bush – no phones, no electricity, so many stars, you’re dazzled!

And here’s a good summary of where my husband and I are going – courtesy of Australia’s greatest poet, Banjo Patterson

“And down by Kosciusko, where the pine-clad ridges raise
Their torn and rugged battlements on high,
Where the air is clear as crystal, and the white stars fairly blaze
At midnight in the cold and frosty sky,
And where around The Overflow the reed beds sweep and sway
To the breezes, and the rolling plains are wide,
The man from Snowy River is a household word today,
And the stockmen tell the story of his ride.”

My husband, who’s British, insists on swimming. It’s cold but crystal clear – we drink it without boiling!
Back on the 22nd April – and thanks for all the hundreds of messages of support.
Tweet@lesleyBeth

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Do You Know of Any ‘Arts Integrated’ Multimedia ELA Curriculum Program for Kindergarten?

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As part of a procurement process, an important government agency has asked us for the names of any competitors to our JazzlesELA program so they can compare resources and pricing.
We are genuinely unaware of any – so I would appreciate your help.

Program Description
JazzlesELA is a complete ‘Arts Integrated’ (or ‘Arts in Education’) program that is fully digitally delivered.
Essentially, the program is a ‘kindergarten-in-the-box’ package containing a fully developed ‘Arts Integrated’ pedagogy, methodology and SCORM compliant LMS resources – including over 500 sequenced, themed, song-powered animations, games and printable activity sheets.

JazzlesELA caters for all VAK-T/learning styles. It features multiple mnemonic strategies based on the Arts – including singing, dance, drama, art and performance.

Meeting/exceeding Common Core State Standards Kindergarten ELA, the supporting 26 Lesson Plans feature advanced ELA strategies that can also be used for Professional Development. For example, how to teach vocabulary, phonemic awareness, creative writing, etc.

Behind all the program’s laughter and fun, there is ‘academic rigor’ tailored appropriately to kindergarten. This claim is supported by two independent theses that demonstrate the program’s potential to overcome 50 years of literacy failure and turn the majority of our children into proficient, even advanced, readers.

You can download the theses from this link I think you will find some astonishing results

Transforming traditional play based learning into 21st Century learning, the program engages mixed diversity classes (including SPED and ESL) at exceptional levels – close to 100%.

While it has very many similarities to A+ schools and Reggio Emilia, it is highly scalable with very easy teacher in-servicing.

The program’s core focus is developing an active vocabulary/oral language base as the precursor to successful reading and learning.

Along with developing all six big ideas of beginning reading, JazzlesELA uses ‘arts integration’ to also develop essential non-cognitive skills such as co-operation, sharing, curiosity, confidence and self esteem.

This government procurement inquiry is a major opportunity for us.
I hope you can help.
Even a ‘no knowledge’ answer would be much appreciated.
lesleybeth@jazzles.com

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5: Emotional and Intellectual Cohesion – Strategies Making the Jazzles Difference

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Creating a cohesive group and happy learning environment!
Management issues in mixed groups arise from children with widely differing levels of cognitive and non cognitive skills and learning style profiles. Your mixed ability class almost certainly will also include children from homes under stress.

Music and coral singing creates group unity and makes everyone feel happier. It’s research-proven that when children are happy and not stressed, they can emotionally engage to learn.

Creating group unity and a common vocabulary base
Jazzles ELA helps from day one, by ‘hooking’ children with jazzy music and group singing that lifts spirits.
Coral singing uniquely develops a common oral language framework with high levels of vocabulary. Not only does singing boost language recall, but automatically practices English pitch and pronunciation for those learning English.
This unity and common teaching language framework (song lyrics) means that children learn because they are all on the same page – including the ‘most at risk’.

Every child can learn best working together in a stress-free, happy, learning environment. With the power of music and song to emotionally engage, Jazzles song-themed learning experiences also engage kinesthetically and visually to cater for all learning styles – ensuring optimal learning and minimal behavior management.

With student management minimized, child-teacher relationships thrive and learning accelerates. Jazzles absolutely delivers happy learning. That’s especially important for those disadvantaged by ethnicity and socio-economic backgrounds.

Here’s how a teacher described the impact.

“My assessments were done last month. Letter/sound recognition has increased, along with interest in reading. But what I notice most is the unity that Jazzles bring to the group. They will just be sitting there ready for snack, and they will start singing. That brings tears to my eyes, because they will have fond memories of singing those songs together. They are excited about Jazzles, and ask for it daily. They just love it!”

Tomorrow: So Many Memory Strategies – but never boring rote!

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