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Serving a new definition of educators! At last!

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For every one interested in the return of Arts to the mainstream curricula, I encourage you to click the link below and read this excellent article:
Reading Through the Arts – How theater and visual arts can engage students in reading.’

What amazed me was the article’s source – it is from ARTSEDGE, an education program of The Kennedy Center.

Maybe I’m showing a bit of naiveté, but I had never associated The Kennedy Center as a mainstream source for teaching and learning in the arts.
Now, thinking about Jacqueline Kennedy’s role in using the White House to “showcase” the arts and her role in establishing the National Cultural Center, now The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, it all makes a lot of sense!

One statistic stands out.
On it’s ‘Welcome to ARTSEDGE’ webpage, The Center says:

“The full impact of ARTSEDGE might be measured by considering that of the eleven million people who participate in Kennedy Center Education Department programming each year, four million do it through ARTSEDGE resources.”
That’s a lot of people!

And the best is yet to come:

The Welcome page continues:
“In an education landscape that is evolving with new ideas of how, when and where we teach, learn and create, the ARTSEDGE team has revisited every part of what— and how—we offer resources. We are expanding our content to serve a new definition of educators, encompassing classroom and out-of-school teachers, with the single-minded goal to support arts-based student learning, whether in the classroom or an informal learning environment, like the home. We’re focused on ways to support innovative teaching with the arts, and meet changing trends in education and to accommodate the ever-evolving impact of technology in our lives. ”

I love it! I hope you do too!
Lesley Beth
(Note: I found the link through Twitter, which provides me with more insight and links to educational movers and shakers than any search engine has ever done.)

Note: From Wikipedia: The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts is the busiest performing arts facility in the United States and annually hosts approximately 2,000 performances for audiences totaling nearly two million; Center-related touring productions, television, and radio broadcasts welcome 20 million more. Now in its 41st season, the Center presents the greatest examples of music, dance and theater; supports artists in the creation of new work; and serves the nation as a leader in arts education. With its artistic affiliate, the National Symphony Orchestra, the Center’s achievements as a commissioner, producer, and nurturer of developing artists have resulted in over 200 theatrical productions, dozens of new ballets, operas, and musical works.

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Placing Emphasis on Vocabulary.

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It is great to see how Jazzles is aligning itself to the Common Core and is placing emphasis on Vocabulary.
My students, especially in the area of Math, struggle with word problems and extended response questions because they do not grasp the terminology used. So I think it’s great what Jazzles is incorporating, and at an early stage. I love that it is so child friendly and has many resources that tap into the different learning modalities. I will definitely update.

New York teacher- Kindergarten and 1st Grade Special Ed.

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What Type of Tears Do You Shed for Your Curriculum Materials?

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“More tears have been shed over wishes granted than wishes denied,”  said the iconic Burmese opposition politician Aung San Suu Kyi
Here are a few instances experienced with Jazzles!
Teacher 1 PreK Headstart Texas

“The kids are loving Jazzles and one of my students cried today because we didn’t have time for Jazzles, I mean real tears. We were getting gifts ready for parents and no time for Jazzles today.  I thought I will make sure that never happens again.

They love all the songs and we are working with letter Nn (No! No!) currently.

Again, Jazzles has made a difference in my program, and the kids request it, sometimes even with tears.  To say they love Jazzles is an understatement”

Teacher 2 Western Australia
“My assessments were done last month. Letter/sound recognition has increased, along with interest in reading. But what I notice most is the unity that Jazzles bring to the group. They will just be sitting there ready for snack, and they will start singing. That brings tears to my eyes, because they will have fond memories of singing those songs together. They are excited about Jazzles, and ask for it daily. They just love it!”

Teacher 3 Illinois

Working with Jazzles Lyrics Pages, these 2nd and 3rd Grade Bilingual Students in an Illinois school brought tears to their teacher’s eyes

Working with Jazzles Lyrics Pages, these 2nd and 3rd Grade Bilingual Students in an Illinois school brought tears to their teacher’s eyes

“Last week, we had student-led conferences with parents and after two of the boys above had finished, the one on the right, Christopher who had arrived in the USA just 8 weeks ago, asked if he could show his mom“the computer”.

I asked him what he wanted to show and said “the songs”. I asked which one and he said (Jazzles) ‘Lots of Love’.

We put it on the screen and the two boys grabbed their song books and proceeded to sing to their moms!

My eyes welled up with tears and I could hardly tell who was smiling more – the boys or their moms.

It was cool!  (It was the two boys on the right above – seen reading their printed Jazzles lyrics.).

When I look over at my students singing along, you can see the level of concentration on their faces. We found out the girls sang ‘Orange Octopus’ better than the boys and ‘No! No! No!’ is definitely a Halloween favorite.

I thought of you often while singing the songs and just wanted you to know you have given our year a significant jump start. Thanks for developing such a unique approach to early literacy.
They think I’m a cool, fun teacher, but you laid the groundwork for all of us!”

 

 

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5: Emotional and Intellectual Cohesion – Strategies Making the Jazzles Difference

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Creating a cohesive group and happy learning environment!
Management issues in mixed groups arise from children with widely differing levels of cognitive and non cognitive skills and learning style profiles. Your mixed ability class almost certainly will also include children from homes under stress.

Music and coral singing creates group unity and makes everyone feel happier. It’s research-proven that when children are happy and not stressed, they can emotionally engage to learn.

Creating group unity and a common vocabulary base
Jazzles ELA helps from day one, by ‘hooking’ children with jazzy music and group singing that lifts spirits.
Coral singing uniquely develops a common oral language framework with high levels of vocabulary. Not only does singing boost language recall, but automatically practices English pitch and pronunciation for those learning English.
This unity and common teaching language framework (song lyrics) means that children learn because they are all on the same page – including the ‘most at risk’.

Every child can learn best working together in a stress-free, happy, learning environment. With the power of music and song to emotionally engage, Jazzles song-themed learning experiences also engage kinesthetically and visually to cater for all learning styles – ensuring optimal learning and minimal behavior management.

With student management minimized, child-teacher relationships thrive and learning accelerates. Jazzles absolutely delivers happy learning. That’s especially important for those disadvantaged by ethnicity and socio-economic backgrounds.

Here’s how a teacher described the impact.

“My assessments were done last month. Letter/sound recognition has increased, along with interest in reading. But what I notice most is the unity that Jazzles bring to the group. They will just be sitting there ready for snack, and they will start singing. That brings tears to my eyes, because they will have fond memories of singing those songs together. They are excited about Jazzles, and ask for it daily. They just love it!”

Tomorrow: So Many Memory Strategies – but never boring rote!

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4: Reading-Songs and VAK Engagement – Strategies Making the Jazzles Difference!

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Here’s today’s challenge!
As an educator, have you ever heard of any publisher focusing on engagement as the single most important contributor to our children’s learning outcomes?
Yet a major, 2007 PISA (OECD) study, shows levels of ‘engagement’ is the the single factor that differentiates nations with the highest and lowest levels of student achievement.

A few days ago, I said I’d pitch Jazzles ELA against any PreK-G1/ESL curriculum program, knowing from experience it will win hands down!

So impressed was this Missouri kindergarten with Jazzles, she wrote a brilliant thesis that explains why Jazzles works.

My kindergarten students sing along with the Jazzles songs constantly and I was astonished to see how much their (DIBELS, Scott Foresman Reading Street and Reading A-Z) scores improved after incorporating the JAZZLES songs. Using actions helps with the total brain stimulation and actually rote memorization as well.

So here’s why I’ve spent my own money creating multimedia resources that emotionally and intellectually engage at extraordinary levels, while also creating harmonious, happy environment, that produces spectacular results.

Why children ignore school bells when Jazzles is around!
As a teacher, I have designed every aspect of the program to do the heavy lifting in terms of VAK engagement, internalization and recall.

So what does the heavy lifting? What creates mixed class unity?
It’s the Jazzles song-powered multimedia resources integrating with performance that ‘dynamizes’ highly engaging VAK learning.

Think of Jazzles as ‘American Idol’ for literacy!
Apart from the amazing memory power of music and song, we have all experienced the power of group singing to motivate and elevate feelings.

Technically, Jazzles songs can be scientifically described as ‘ear-worms’ – ‘a piece of music that gets stuck in your head so you hear it, even when it‘s not being played’. Uniquely, Jazzles applies ‘ear-worms’ strategically and comprehensively to its English Language Arts System – specifically targeting beginning reading skills and oral English.

Leaving animation aside, Jazzles songs are prolifically alliterative. Children love alliteration that in songs, acts as a very powerful, language mnemonic – particularly in developing Oral Vocabulary, Phonological Awareness and Alphabetic Principle – 3 of the five most important predictors of future literacy success.

JazzleOke 1 – it’s a powerful, scaffolded ‘pot-pourri’ of VAK-ELA learning!
Singing, cartoons, captions, involuntary/repetitive movements of hands
and feet moving in synchrony … no other program moves children to learn like Jazzles ELA!!

The emotional engagement of group singing and animation enhances the meaning of the ‘matching captions’ – and the ‘matching captions’ in turn incorporate built-in phonological learning.
That’s why each Jazzles ELA unit is a ‘learn to read’ power pack!

Every time students, interact with a JazzleOke 1 they are seeing, hearing, singing, and moving by tapping, dancing or playing a percussion instrument to the beat, performing by miming or using actions. Every child’s learning style profile is engaged for optimal learning.

AND, they are actively learning the 6 big beginning reading skills while happily practicing oral English!

Jazzles song-themed Lesson Plans expand and consolidate with the social interaction of Visual and Performing Arts.

Following on from JazzleOke1’s interactive learning, your ‘reading stars’ can perform ‘karaoke style’ to JazzleOke 2 and JazzleOke 3 with backing tracks. Their fun performances effortlessly practice reading skills (L- R tracking and return sweep, one to one correspondence, letter/sound/word correspondence) and oral English while developing confidence!

For those interested in educational frameworks based on research in the learning sciences, Jazzles is following the three core principles of the Universal Design for Learning:
• multiple means of engagement (VAK)
• multiple means of action and expression(Visual and Performing Arts)
• multiple means of representation

Name another beginning ELA/ESL program that has children so eagerly and happily practicing!
Don’t believe me! Just download the free install and try it. Observe your class – now tell what child is not engaged by the humor and antics in these colorful song powered cartoons?

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